Real Ramen in Condesa

ooooooMmmg real ramen!! If ya know the Japanese guy who teaches salsa in Parque Mexico, you’d know he puts out a list of his favs + most authentic. This Condesa restaurant is half Asian kitchen/cooking supplies, half restaurant — and it’s riquisimosso

Ramen Sairi ラーメン 彩理
https://www.facebook.com/ramensairi2019/

Sidebar: my transportation is the Ecobici, I ride it wherever I go, unless I’m walking with my dogs. Today was the first day I said to myself, “ohhhhh I won’t be gone that long, I won’t need my raincoat nor any other rain gear.” Well naturally the hugest rainstorm blew in just as I finished my ramen and I decided to blast on home for the 13 minute bike ride — and what a treat that was NOT! Literally strikes of lightning and thunder, I was completely soaked to the bone and in hindsight it was a pretty stupid thing to do, but I was fueled by a powerful broth, hiiiiiijole

Sketching CDMX Chinatown Chaos

Sketching the Chaos of CDMX

Sunday in Mexico City, after a long bike ride up el Paseo, I stopped on the edge of Chinatown to capture some chaos with my Sharpie pen and fluorescent highlighters, inspired by my Zoom Sketch Sessions #kaPOW

I live in Mexico City hiiiiiijole

I moved to Mexico City and I don’t know anyone here. I have my two dogs; Chiquis, who is my “Henny Penny the Sky is Falling”, and often I just hold her and hug her until her breathing returns to normal. In the wee hours of the night however, I’m right there with her: earthquakes, water supply, Covid, banditos and oh yeah right that delta –the hits just keep on hitting. There’s a lot of fear on that side of my mind, but then there’s Bun. She, on the other hand, is having an absolute ball. So many creatures to flirt with, parks to explore, trees to sniff and ohhhh so many butts! I am both my dogs and grateful to have them at my side as I adapt to this new city.
I am also so glad I stumbled upon this Brene Brown video this morning…. that elusive notion of belonging anywhere has always been a thing for me; I never felt I belonged starting with my family and it evolved from there. This past year I truly embraced and honed in on being an artist; I’ve balls-to-the-wall leaned into my craft and it provides me with focus and makes me feel like I belong. I’ve been in Mexico City 10 days and in this short amount of time a few of my drawings are now proudly hanging in some of the corner cafes in this no-gringo neighborhood, and people wave to me as I walk the streets with my dogs. I don’t know anyone but I know everyone. Art is my reason, art makes my life sacred, art connects me to this world. So very grateful for this sense of belonging ❤

Cafe Sketching

Coffee Sketching

My first morning in Navarte, I knew exactly where I wanted to have coffee: Cafe Cafe CDMX. I did my research and wanted to visit the cafes that did their homework, and their research. Oh and I also needed some good neighborhood aesthetics for my early morning coffee sketch!

I’m really enjoying the Continuous Line practice, it feels like a grand roller coaster and I cannot get off until the end. It helps for me to push through the fear of not knowing what to draw next; it doesn’t matter becasue I’m on my way. I’ve incorporated it into my Zoom Sketch Sessions and I hear a number of participants comment that it’s helping them to break through fears as well.

My morning sketches, which I give to the cafe:

Sketching La Casa de Las Brujas

Soooo much amazing architecture in Mexico City; today I chose to draw La Casa de Las Brujas, an incredible building with an incredible history. The building looks like a witch’s hat and the story goes some high-ranking witches used to call this home, and their high-ranking clientele used to visit!

For me the travel sketcher, I threw down some pencil lines to frame it up, then went at it with my sailor fude fountain pen to create a continuous line, a little white crayon then the watercolor. I forgot to add people, I was so in the moment, but I’ll be back to sketch The David, who was right behind me, wooooH0000 Buenas Noches Witches!!

My one-minute movie:

Sketching La Casa de Las Brujas

La Parroquia del Purísimo Corazón de María

El Purísimo Corazón de María

I’ve been wanting to see this church since I arrived; Saturday was the first time I was able to slip in between communions and baptismals, yowzah.

 

It’s a ginormous concrete of a building, and their website offers a lengthy history, but here’s the final gist:

El Purísimo Corazón de María is a parish which is located on Gabriel Mancera Street between Torres Adalid and Luz Saviñon, where Division del Norte, Amores and Colonia Del Valle avenues converge, in the neighborhood of the same name. The total height of the Parish is 65 meters with its 20 meter high polyhedron dome topped by the image of Mary with semi-open arms that together with its base measures 10 meters and can be seen from a great distance; It is a unique church thanks to such a figure that is at its peak. Few know his name and think that the great figure that crowns its dome is a Christ instead of the Virgin Mary.

There are still more people who do not know the name of the temple and lack to know it, they call it “Our Lady of Transit”, because with its open arms it seems to want to contribute to speed up the vehicular traffic that converges on the neighboring avenues of División del Norte, Colonia Del Valle y Amores around what was the Glorieta de Mariscal Sucre.
Both the exterior and interior are striking for their great beauty, full of extraordinary details on all sides. Inside, its stained glass windows stand out, its candelabra next to the benches, its gilt bronze tabernacle with a revolving base, the main image in its dressing room of the Virgin Mary with the Child God (it measures 4 meters high and is the work of Antonio Ballester), the murals that cover an area of 1400 meters created by the painter Pedro Cruz, the two high reliefs alluding to the motherhood of Mary, on the outside its monumental concrete façade, its staircase, the three wide gilt bronze doors, its two concrete towers symmetrical that finish off the façade, its majestic architecture that is described as a mix between art deco and functionalism with a certain gothic air.
Inside the temple you can see fantastic stained glass windows and murals that represent various biblical passages in an extraordinary architecture.
It is likely that for all these reasons, in 1996 Australian director Baz Luhrmann chose this Parish as one of the main locations for his film “William Shakespeare’s Romeo & Juliet” starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Claire Danes.
http://purisimocorazon.org.mx/contenido/parroquia/79

My Urban Sketching Club

Esperanza en CDMX

I have my own urban sketchers’ club, since the Covid situation is doing anything but improving, and it’s super important for me to be mindful of what’s happening in Mexico City. I will continue to walk with my “club” members, capture scenes in my sketchbook, and will hope there’s some esperanza for those who can endure through these strange pandemic days (happening all over, not just Mexico).

I think without my art, I would have lost my mind ages ago…. it’s my greatest meditation tool (#continuouslinedrawing #ftw), it helps me connect with people (they stop to say hello to my dogs or look at what I’m doing), and it marks a time and place in my life that’s the greatest and coolest memoir EVAH. Stay safe, maneuver mindfully not insatiably, and help keep your community safe.

Continuous Line Drawings Ommmmm

Line Art

July 2021 Roma Norte

I’ve been doing a lot of Continuous Line Drawings these days, as a way to calm myself and get lost in the line making. I drew “The David” on location — that was HARD and I’m not even referring to the fact that it started raining. It takes a lot of inner calm to not worry about the people, my abilities, my materials, my phone, my anxiety — and just lean into the drawings which are honestly so much fun. Red Square and Midwest Carnival done in the Zoom Sketch Sessions, I’m making everyone try this meditative art practice OMMMMMMMMmmmm #dropsmic

Drawing the David, see how I did it:

Top Notch CDMX Coffee Culture

July 2021 Mexico City

Delicious coffee explorations continue, and my coffee sketches are being shared by the cafes I’ve visited! Today we went to Mercado Lazaro Cardenas in Del Valle; no pets are allowed in Mercado, but ask nicely and the Señora selling bancos to the side of the main entrance will kindly watch your doggies while retrieving a delicious swan-topped coffee. Not possible to sketch this one, so I’ll look for another opp 🤓 Deeeeeeeeelicious coffee!!!

CAFÉ Passmar serves up a damn fine cup of coffee, and I bought some to have on hand.

Adolfo Prieto s/n Local 237 Col. Del Valle Norte, Deleg. Benito Juárez, CDMX
IG: @passmaroficial

Moved to Mexico City

Andale CDMX

I moved to Mexico City’s Colonia Navarte in July, 2021, with Chiquis and Bunner in tow, just a tad south of Roma Sur— and so far I love it!! It’s a tranquilo  residential neighborhood full of people walking their dogs, quality coffee culture and a high ranking neighborhood for taco aficionados. I’m looking forward to becoming a local —and sketching it along the way (temporarily lost my sketching mojo, will trust that it’ll find its way back — we’ve got work to do!!).

Dr. Temple Grandin’s 2020 Keynote

Dr. Grandin Zoom
Last night I listened to Dr. Temple Grandin’s keynote Zoom speech for Niman Ranch, because I was interested in hearing her thoughts on the meat industry during the Covid days (years). Dr. Grandin is a big part of why I got into the meat industry, because I wanted to make a difference in how cattle were treated before they became part of our food system, and boy oh boy is the food system fractured TO SAY THE LEAST.
First, Dr. Grandin could not stress enough the importance of supporting local. She stays awake at night thinking about the extremely precarious and fragile electric grid; I think we can all see how delicate and jimmy-rigged it all is. Support local as much as possible, and YES it will cost more because they don’t have the convenience of scaling. Know where you can buy everything local, as much as possible. I know we’re all swayed by the convenience of Costco, Amazon, Walmart — they couldn’t make it any easier, but their systems are completely fragile and unbalanced.
Second: educate the children. This is the most uneducated the country has been (isn’t painfully obvious, given the political landscape?). America does not know how to do anything anymore, and it shows. Dr. Grandin is a HUGE advocate for getting the trade skills back in school, which were eliminated about 25 years ago. All meat plants have to be sent over in pieces from China in 100 containers because no one knows how to build them. She said in a million different ways how important it is to support local, and referred to her local Fort Collins economy and the number of craft beer companies who co-exist with Budweiser. You can have big, big is not always bad, but when there is trouble, we all suffer from Big. GO LOCAL
 
I’m not encouraging supporting local only in the meat industry because I’m connected to Cañada de la Virgen; no matter what your food lifestyle is as this point, meat or no meat, it’s important to support local as much as we can. I know most of us are freaked out about the world, our lives, our families, our jobs, money or lack thereof, every day seems to be a bit whackier the day before, but look at what’s right in front of you and be aware of how you live. Reign in where you can, support local as is possible. Remember to breathe, set your priorities, know and support your neighbors and do your best to not get involved in the wretched hate fest happening in America. That ship is sinking, I think it’s painfully clear, so do what you can to prepare to the future.
 
Also: Dr. Grandin Zooms in her kitchen and has pictures of cows on her fridge just like me!!!

Save the Planet, Get Grounded, Think Clearly

Although we should be looking at what we can do every day in order to live more responsibly in the world, today that conversation may be louder due to global protests and profound activists. The vegan message is loud, but that’s no solution because massive amounts of industrialized soy and corn are needed to make those fake meat burgers, which is enormously damaging, as is all industrialized farming.

I see lots of people rave about cheap food in Mexico; food is cheap for a lot of reasons, and the industrialized methods are just as prevalent in Mexico as they are with our neighbors to the north. You can eat at Pollo Feliz and watch truckloads of fat, diseased chickens drive by on their way to slaughter, it’s that viceral.

I see people on the pro-meat side of the world encouraging meat eating to save the planet, and none of it means a thing if you source your meat or vegetables from industrialized chemical farms. There’s no easy solution, but maybe together we can help each other be more accountable to our choices.

It goes deeper than the label, deeper than the price. Head swirling with all there is to think about…. get grounded, go local, be present, cut out the middleman, think clearly. Peace out from this ol’Farm Crone #regenerativeagriculture

Autumn Equinox at Cañada de la Virgen

Mid-September is a gorgeous time on Cañada de la Virgen; fruits and vegetables are coming into full maturation, the days are a bit cooler and ending a bit earlier, insects are moulting into their next carnation, and the full Harvest Moon put on a grand show in the clear dark skies of Central Mexico. I love spending time on the farm and enjoying the fruits of the season, so incredibly special.

In Brugge? Yes, it’s a fairytale thing

The unbearable heatwave in Amsterdam ended almost as soon as the  Urban Sketchers Symposium’s closing ceremony, and I was thrilled to jump on a train and head to Belgium, with a stop in Antwerp, bound for Brugge. I’ll be honest I first learned about Brugge about ten years ago when the movie “In Brugge” came out, and knew immediately it was a town I wanted to see and explore, even though it was the butt of many jokes throughout the dark-ish yet hilarious-ish movie.

I was NOT disappointed! It was cloudy and cool when I arrived, and lucky me chose and Airbnb room equipped with a bike, which was the perfect method to travel about the area. I totally fell for medieval Brugge, enjoyed its history museum, the main plaza, the locally produced beer, and I will never, ever forget the incredible Belgium chocolate sold in about every third shoppe. Belgium has never really ranked on a “must-see” list, but now I’m scheming to find ways to return. It was lovely, delightful, gorgeous, so long as you stayed a step ahead of the throngs of tourists who arrive by the busload beginning about 10am, but by that time I was well on my way to see windmills and the beach-loving dachunds on the Netherland coast. Sunset in Brugge, which much like Amsterdam lasted about four hours, was a delightful time to watch the twinkling lights come alive in Brugge, as the horses clopped by, and the action turned local.

On my way to the airport, I stopped for an afternoon in Brussels, and as a good student of Rick Steves, I marched right into the Tourist Office to ask what should I see right here, right now. They told me the Royal Belgium Palace is only open to the public four weeks each each, and today was the first day, so they recommended I march right over — and oo-la-la I did march right over! I saw the Royal Belgium Palace in all its glory! After that, a quick handstand in the Grand Marketplace, followed by some mussels from Brussels and a gorgeous local beer, and then away I went.

Three days, that’s all I had, and I can’t wait to return. I see there’s an illustration workshop there early next year…. hey what a great idea, a sketch workshop IN BRUGGE … <3

Urban Sketchers Symposium 2019 Amsterdam

July, 2019 I finally attended my first Urban Sketchers Symposium, this year held in Amsterdam, The Netherlands –and it was amazing! The only downside was that there was a historic heatwave throughout all of Europe, and made it quite challenging to endure the long days spent sketching out in the streets. I stayed in an adorable attic apartment, but it was sweltering as well, so it was a crazy-hot and bright week. Would I do it again? IN A HEARTBEAT. Next year’s event will be held in Hong Kong, and it’s my intention to get my heiney and my sketchbook in HKG next April!

My photos and sketches from my time in sweltering Amsterdam, where I took the following workshops:

Memories of a City, Reportage with Veronica Lawlor
Amsterdam Rooftops with Hugo Costa
Urban Portraits with Marina Grechanik

Easter at Rancho Cañada de la Virgen

I could not be more delighted to be aligned with Central Mexico’s only certified organic cattle ranch and federally protected sanctuary, Cañada de la Virgen. I’ve been aware of this ranch and it’s owners from the first month I began making grass-fed beef, because their products went in the shelves the same month as the beef products I was producing. In the ensuing months, I watched as their products became more professional; their labels became more informed and I remember declaring to myself, “they are in it to WIN IT.” I studied their pricing structure because I was basically winging it and following prices in America, which made no sense to apply those rigors in Mexico. I searched the internets to discover more about Cañada de la Virgen, and although I found much information about their sacred pyramid and the tourism it supports, I found very little about their beef production. I was intrigued.

I then found myself without a ranch and a place to do business. It was a terrifying time once again, as I had no idea what I was going to do and how I was going to support myself. I quietly crawled through this muck and mire of disillusionment, yet my determination to work in the cattle industry could not be extinguished. Somehow I was going to find a way.

A few weeks later, I received a message to contact Sophia Trapp, the owner and director of Cañada de la Virgen. I knew very little about her, she was this mysterious female cattle rancher living in Mexico, raising her children and carrying on her mother’s work. I had to know her.

I met Sophia and after some initial conversations, I learned her mission was to make and have available clean meat for the mothers of Mexico. Most of the good meat produced in Mexico is exported, leaving the sub-par cuts of meat here at home for the people of Mexico. Sophia has stayed true to this mission, as the meat is packaged for ease of cooking and consumption for mom’s making meals at home. I totally respect this mission and believe in it as well. On about our third meeting, she said, “Why aren’t you working with us? We love your passion and dedication to this industry, and where else in the world would I find someone that gets the spiritual side of sacrificing cows?”

It’s been an amazing education to work the Cañada de la Virgen team, and I will always think of them as my family and friends. We’ve done amazing work together, put the business on the national map, and we now sell organic grass-fed, grass-finished meat throughout all of Mexico.

I spent Easter weekend with the family at the Hacienda, and I absolutely love the opportunity to stick my hands and feet into the sacred and magical dirt of Cañada de la Virgen, and hope to return in the years to come.

Cows have a hold over us, and once you develop a passion for them, it will never leave you.” —Werner Lampert, The Cow, A Tribute

A Portal Named San Diego

 

For some time now, I’ve been searching for a way to get back to the Mother Country, back into the fold, to expand my business, my network, my craft and career. Yet I kept coming up against a big fat stupid wall, and could see no clear path before me. The work I’ve done in Mexico has been like no other work; I’ve had monumental experiences with cattle ranching, butchering, and ethical meat like I never would in America, yet it has all whet my whistle to want to experience more — and become a stronger advocate. I’m extremely grateful to the people and places that have presented and provided opportunities in the past few years, ay Chihuahua what an education!

Somehow along the way while in Mexico, I lost contact with the family I once knew, and it’s been quite odd to no longer have a home nor place in America — anywhere in America. I’ve never been okay with this lack of status. Thankfully, I’ve come to know a vital and strong local community, and continue to meet new friends and allies within my sketching and ethical meat communities.

I’ve had a desire to get back to America for some time now, even as the country marinates in a strange orange hue. My schemes and dreams have often awakened me in the wee hours of the night, because I’m not ready to live full time in a retirement town. There’s still much more to sort out, yet I found a portal opportunity in San Diego, California — and I couldn’t be more delighted to cast the net in that direction.

I’ve been approved to teach “Sketch Balboa Park” as an Airbnb Experience, and I begin in May, as I will be there for an extended Memorial Day holiday. I’m excited to stay at a friend’s house and dog sit her brilliantly bouncy dog, Belle. I’m bringing Art Leap Adventures with me, as it’s time to make it a legit business and expand my efforts into America and market to a larger audience. I’ll to continue to organize sketch tours to Mexico, partner with more top-notch instructors, and explore the fascinating and diverse country that is Mexico.


It’s good to learn how to sketch, and I’ll continue to encourage people to do so. We all need a break from our screaming phones, no?

I am not abandoning my ethical meat and cattle welfare efforts; in fact I feel as though I’ve gone as far as I could in Mexico, and now it’s time to take it home. I continue to stay current with the Regenerative Agriculture communities of America, yet it’s certain more will be revealed when I’m on the ground. Meat is so mysterious in America, mostly fast and cheap, as is much of the food these days. Now it’s my turn to follow my own advice to find a local farmer and hold him or her tight — because I’ll need a local source for good clean meat and bones.


Weeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee I’m so excited to get back to America!

What is a Modern Farmer REPOST

I’m re-posting my explanation of how and why I became a Modern Farmer, and will ignore the desire to make changes like omitting a person, and will allow the excitement of my new found passion, purpose, clarity and gratitude remain the focus of the story.

~~~~~~~~~~

In 2013, I was hit with a powerful waterfall of emotions and tears as I blurted out I wanted to be a Modern Farmer, in the last hour of the last day of a Sonia Choquette six-sensory workshop. A Modern Farmer, what the heck does that mean?!! Aside from the magazine of the same name, I was very unclear about where this explosion of feelings came from, and laughed and scoffed the entire way home, no way could I be a modern farmer, oh the audacity!

Truth be told, once I uttered those words, I felt as if I had been hit by lightning; the spark had been lit but I had no idea what to do with it. A modern farmer, you say!? Oh stop.

sonia_workshop
Moments after declaring my Modern Farming ambitions

I did spend the first few years of my life on a dairy farm in Huntley, Illinois, although I have little-to-no-memory of it. But now that both my parents were dead, the pull to be in the country was strong, much to my chagrin. I fought it, dug my heels in, as I really believed I was supposed to be in Chicago. I was a Big City Gal, in fact, I was afraid of the country and all its creatures that go boo in the night; the wide open spaces made me terribly nervous. Give me a deserted city street at midnight any time over a quiet country, star-lit night. Once while house-sitting for my brother and his wife in Hebron, Illinois, I called 911 because I heard noises and was certain I was about to be terrorized. After a brief inspection, the policemen said to me, “do you realize that’s the wind?”

I called the cops on the wind.

There had been such tremendous and rapid loss at this point in my life; jobs, addresses, jewelry, my truck — my mom — and through all this I could feel the magnetic pull back to the country. Or maybe it was fear? Or, I know, it was shame, because how embarrassing to lose my everything, so why not run to the country with my tail between my legs? And what was I supposed to do, pray tell, become a tomato farmer? Can I support myself on tomatoes? Maybe a sprout farmer? My track record with plants has never been great and now I think I can be a sprout farmer? Fat Chance. I may have been sitting squarely in the farmlands of Northern Illinois-Southern Wisconsin, but I had a snowball’s chance in hell to become a farmer, modern or old-timey, at this point.

I filed the day dream away and continued my desperate search of WHAT AM I GOING TO DO WITH MY LIFE?!

Days after Sonia’s workshop, it was Thanksgiving, and thanks to a wonderful invite from my generous ex-husband, Reed, I made my way back to San Miguel de Allende and then to Austin, which I now call home. I quickly forgot all about my farming declaration and moved on to the task of cleaning up the wreckage from my past. I was a fairly miserable girl when I was married to Reed and had felt terribly guilty about how our marriage ended. It ended badly. Certainly not the worst divorce in the world, but I never got over the guilt for my bad behavior and selfish ways. The years I lived in Illinois after the divorce were one big alcohol-fueled guilt trip. This was my opportunity to make amends for my harmful behavior.

frida_diego

Whether he would agree or not, I believe I have made amends to the best of my abilities, first and foremost by being kind to the deserving Reed, and then by trying to be there in ways I had not been in the past. Not everyone gets a shot at this, nor would many want one, and even though it’s been messy and painful all over again, I am super-grateful I had this opportunity to make right a few of my wrongs. This has helped me to grow up. I like growing up, it feels good.

In early August of this year, after returning once again to San Miguel, I overheard Reed on the phone making a deal to sell his Mexican cows to a factory farm in Northern Mexico. Wait, wait, whoa, whoa WHAT?! I said as he hung up the phone.

Reed purchased his ranch in Dolores Hidalgo after we married in 2005; there were little or few cattle when he purchased it, and he spent the past 10 years adding to and cleaning up the breed of Limousin cattle to create a fine, handsome, beautiful breed of cattle; in addition to drilling for water and creating a majestic, sprawling, lush, 250-hectare Guanajuato rancho. The sound of the wind is amazing out here; I would never call the cops on it.

RSN
Majestic Rancho Santo Niño

Given my recent experience with a thyroid condition and the need to eat paleo, yet finding little-to-no resources for grass-fed beef in San Miguel de Allende, I chimed in with, “we need grass-fed beef right here in San Miguel and that’s what you have. Why don’t we make meat right here instead of shipping them off to a feed lot, where the cows are mostly wanted only for their arrachera?” Reed responded, “If you can find someone to process the cows, you can have some cows.”

The next day I was at Via Organica, aka, Central Mexico’s Whole Foods, and within two weeks, the team was assembled to produce grass-fed beef.

RSN_cover
The handsome Limousin cattle of Rancho Santo Niño

And so began Rancho Santo Niño.

I had spent the past year living with the cows at Reed’s ranch in Texas; I practiced reiki on them, played crystal bowls for them, and especially loved watching the Texas sunsets with them within an earshot. I loved those cows and had (have) great regard for them. Reed says, “cows are dumb.” I say no they are not! They are amazing mothers and any creature that is a wonderful mother is not dumb.

crystalbowls
Playing the crystal bowls off the back of the pick-up for the Texas cows

While I have great respect for the cows and their place in the world, I do know why these cows are here. They are fuel for the people. Oh but how to get them to the people?!

I think factory farming is an unspeakable, horrible injustice to all the animals churned out through them, in turn turning out sick food; to which some people have responded, yeah but you kill the cows too! This is true, but how the cows are treated until it is their time to become fuel for the people is where I want to do it different. I see the hidden videos of how animals are slaughtered; it bothers me tremendously as well. Have you see the Temple Grandin’s movie? She understood this on an entirely different level.

The hard-working cattle ranchers out there producing responsibly raised grass-fed beef are my inspiration, and I don’t pretend for one moment to be a fraction of a rancher, nor skilled tradesperson that they are, but I have learned amazing things through them and with my own experience of working with the ranchers and butchers of Dolores Hidalgo. I have thrown my hat in the ring of producing responsibly-raised grass-fed beef and this makes me incredibly proud and I am excited as I forge ahead and learn new things everyday. I am in on every step of this process and believe it has made me a kinder person, a more mindful person and the gratitude I feel each day when I drink my bone broth is a feeling I don’t want to shake anytime soon.

Producing grass-fed beef been a profound experience thus far.

Cattle ranching done right can save the world’s global warming demise, so says Allan Savory; his TED Talk is extremely moving and inspiring.

Oh and that declaration I made two years ago? I suppose it came true…

 

 

Tragic day in Paris

With each line I thought of my time in Paris, the boy I dated, the friends I met, and the streets I walked. She will be rebuilt, but I know many of us watched in horror as the flames engulfed the mighty catedral.